Temp Agency Los Angeles | Slogan In Your Resume?
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Is There A Slogan In Your Resume ?

January 16, 2019

 

 

 

Too often, candidates think a job search is all about selling their specific skills. Skills are only commodities. They get you in the door, but they don’t win you the job. HR managers now receive 100 or more resumes per job posting, so it’s easy to get lost in the resume shuffle with dozens of other candidates. How can you stand out and get selected? A top rated Temp Agency in Los Angeles gives some great insight below.


 

A great way to do this is to develop a “slogan” of your own. Slogans – or “branding images” or “taglines” – work by promising you a benefit for using a particular product.


 

What’s Your Benefit?

Employers don’t buy just skills. They want to know how you can be an asset to their bottom line. This boils down to only two areas where you can provide a benefit:

  • How will you help an employer make money?

  • How will you help an employer save money?

When you answer this question, you set yourself apart from most of your competitors. The best way to accomplish this is to develop your own slogan. Called a “Unique Selling Proposition” (USP), this is a short sentence that describes a major, unique benefit that you can offer your next employer.

 

 

Add Strength to Skills

For example, if you’re a project manager you have a number of skills, such as software, hardware and management expertise. Trouble is, most other project managers competing with you have the same skills. If you think further, though, you find your particular strength might be your ability to identify and solve problems early in your projects.

 


So your USP goes something like this:

“Seasoned project manager with a strength in identifying and solving problems.”


 

Find the Money

Now add one more item, and that’s the benefit to the employer. Since employers buy “making money” or “saving money,” try to find a way to attach dollars to it. This is called monetizing your benefit and it’s what will separate you from every other project manager you compete with. It may take some research or calculations but it’s well worth the effort when trying to impress employers looking to shore up their recruiting efforts.


 

Try to arrive at a conservative figure for how much money you helped your employer make or save on a given project, sale or time period. In this case, our project manager calculated that he helped save his employer over $3 million in a three-year period while he completed over $12 million in projects. His USP becomes this:


 

 

“Seasoned project manager whose strengths in identifying and solving problems have saved my employer over $3 million while completing over $12 million worth of projects during the past 3 years.”


 

 

Jason Bivins, President Of Great Hire, A Temp Agency in Los Angeles tells us "By placing this one sentence front and center at the top of his resume (as a “summary” statement), magic can start to happen. No longer is this candidate a commodity. The employer can clearly see the benefit of having an employee who can bring their special talent to help save $3 million."

 

 

 

 

 

 

Great Hire Human Resources is a staffing agency providing high quality staffing solutions in Los Angeles, Orange, & Riverside Counties & Direct Hire Services Nationwide. 

 

 

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